Democratic Voters Face a Decision: Bernie Sanders or Joe Biden

Democratic presidential hopefuls former US Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders arrive onstage for the fourth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season co-hosted by The New York Times and CNN at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio on October 15, 2019. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)

NICHOLAS KAMM

Democratic presidential hopefuls former US Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders arrive onstage for the fourth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season co-hosted by The New York Times and CNN at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio on October 15, 2019. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)

Brianna Skaff

As the Democratic candidates boil down to Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders, America ushers that now is the time to be voting. As a new generation of voters arises in time for the presidential collection, there is a hope for the voting percentage to increase. However, data analysis shows that the youth are not showing up to vote.

Senator Bernie Sanders has built a large sum of campaign to cater to the youth and encourage them to vote through promises of debt free education and climate change. However, according to the Pew Research Center, the United States 26th in voter turnout of the 32 countries in which voting rates could be compared. The evidence can be shown in Super Tuesday’s primaries, as only 13% of the Democratic voters in the primary were between the ages of 18-29. 

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Sanders comments, “The key to this election is, can we get millions of young people who have never voted before into the political process — many working people who understand that Trump is a fraud — can we get them voting?” 

As multiple seniors at SWHS approach or are already 18, students begin to question whether they should register to vote. Senior, Jennette Jacobs argues that “Teens are barely out of high school, they aren’t necessarily working, so I feel like there’s a certain age when you’re out living in the world where you’re more in the adult world where you actually are going to be affected by what the president chooses. I think people enjoy that freedom [to vote], but is it fair to the people who are really going to be affected economically to the decisions being made.” 

Still others concur that one vote can make all the difference in the elections, and help to promote some ideals that teenagers at SWHS look up to.

If you are looking to register to vote but are unsure, click the link below.

 

https://voterregistration.ct.gov/OLVR/welcome.do